The Messenger killed. Judgement for All.

Today’s (Fr 03/06/2016) FDRs are from 2 Samuel 1 and Revelation 20 .

1 Samuel 2 – As we change books into the second book of Samuel it is worth noting that this book should be read as a continuation of the first although David shortly becomes the major focus.

While there is a sense of unfair treatment for the Amalekite messenger who, it appears was expecting a reward for finishing-off David’s public enemy (v10), David acts with continued great regard for Saul, (God’s appointed King, Jonathan’s father, and previously David’s direct boss) and has the messenger killed.  David continues to pay particular respect to King Saul, not just as his great friend’s father but as the person God carefully appointed to be King over Israel.

Given the breakdown in relationship between David and Saul it would have been very easy to dismiss Saul’s death as a gift and concentrate on Jonathan’s death in David’s dirge.  Yet this is not what David does.  He respects God’s choice of King and the dirge that follows (vv 19 – 27) and expresses his and his men’s grief over the death of both the  leaders yet the defeat of Israel is not included here.  Jonathan rates a particular mention in vv 25 and 26 as befits a very close friend, who was like a brother to David.  This expression, of his brotherhood with Jonathan, brings into the spotlight David’s son-like relationship with Saul.  This Saul who sought to take his life many times is still considered as a father to David!

We can see here a representation of God’s love for you and I.  Despite all we do in sin God still loves us and through His grace has provided His Son, Jesus to stand for us on Judgement Day.

Hypothetically, If we were unforgiving of Saul, as it is easy to be, then David and Saul’s relationship would have ended in a cave where Saul went to relieve himself and David had advantage over him.  NO more running and hiding.  NO more separation from his brother Jonathan.  NO serving the Philistine King.  Oh – and Jonathan would be free of his father.  Seems easy doesn’t it?

Yet, if we were to act as in the above hypothetical, we would be discounting and dishonouring God who had Samuel anoint Saul as King.

As I write this I am convicted that I should examine my own human responses to people whom God has put in my life!  People I have turned from because of some apparent offense!  Equally important, I realise an assessment of my life’s relationship with my God appointed King Jesus Christ is necessary.  Regularly and when prompted.

Revelation 20 – This chapter of Revelation, for me, is the pivot point of this book.  Satan and the Devil, already defeated at death by Jesus’ death and resurrection, is bound and finally (v10) restrained forever.

Judgement follows for me, and us all, everyone (vv 11-15).  In John’s vision, against books recording our deeds and also against the Book of Life.

These verses provide a clear view of the Bible’s expectation of what happens here on Judgement Day.  (I encourage you to refresh or inform your memory about this aspect of our Christian life.)

Matthew 16:27-28

Romans 2:5-11  
[You might like to read this passage more broadly than these six verses.]

2 Corinthians 5:10

A Prayer – Lord and Father, may I respect and treat with care those whom you bring me in contact with in whatever circumstance.  Forgive me Father, in Christ’s name, for those whom I have offended or deliberately hurt.  Help me keep observant and active in my relationships so that I treat your children, and those who do not know you, with the same respect and care that Jesus demonstrated.  I ask these things in Jesus name.  Amen.

Glenn

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One thought on “The Messenger killed. Judgement for All.

  1. Thanks Glenn, what a mighty loving God we serve. What a challenge for each of us, so easy to be judgemental and yet we should be forgiving and looking for opportunities to show God’s love to everyone. What a huge and awesome event it will be when we all stand before God and fully realise His deep, deep love for us all as individuals. Thanks again Glenn.

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