Certainty in a Glorious God

Today’s reading is taken from 1 Samuel 14 & Revelation 4.

As you read 1 Samuel 14 the theme that jumps out at you is one of deep certainty. Jonathan, perhaps a highly disciplined warrior makes a rash move – one which in usual circumstances would require the validation of the resident prophet or priest. On the surface one might think Jonathan’s actions to be reckless and destructive. A possible outcome of his little escapade could have become a case of national humiliation where the king’s son ends up -in a best case scenario- a P.O.W., or -worst case- probably with his head on a pole. But this move is not made by some knuckle-head soldier hungry for blood. Jonathan proves to be a man of great faith with a deep certainty in the God of Israel.

For one Jonathan knows his history. The promise made to Abram in Gen. 12:1 goes like this: ‘Leave your country… and go to the land I will show you.’ Egypt was definitely not that land. God redeemed Israel and brought them out of there so that He could lead them to the land where a life of blessing might be enjoyed. Jonathan is well aware that the land of Canaan (occupied by the Philistines) ‘flowing with milk and honey’ is where the Lord is leading His people. So this war against pagan Philistine is essentially God’s war – one that He is fighting on behalf of His people. It is then with this certainty that Jonathan says in v.6b that ‘nothing can hinder the Lord from saving, whether by many or by few’.

1 Samuel 13:5 gives an intimidating inventory of the Philistine army – which by the looks of things is force to be reckoned with. Only someone daft enough would walk into that camp with a young armour-bearer by his side hoping for a victory. But such is the case with most things of God. God makes a promise to a childless Abraham in Gen. 17:5ff to make him ‘a father of many nations’ and ‘very fruitful’ at the ripe old age of 100. This too might have seemed daft at the time to Abraham. Genesis 17:17 says that in fact ‘he laughed’ at the thought of this. In 1 Samuel 16, Samuel seems keen to anoint Eliab to be king of Israel, probably based on his stout appearance. But instead the skinny shepherd-boy -the after-thought- is chosen by God to lead His people. God often chooses the weak, the meek, the lowly and the resource-poor to carry out his purposes and to display his power and glory.

Jonathan trusts in the power and might of his God and not in his own resources. His faith and deep certainty in the Most High reveals to him that the strength of an army is redundant when God is involved. Revelation 4 reinforces this vision of God by painting a vivid picture of His throne where the all-powerful God of the universe who spoke the heavens into existence sits (Ps. 33). Let these words written by John the Apostle be our prayer today: “You are worthy, our Lord and God, to receive glory and honour and power, for you created all things, and by your will they were created and have their being.”

Sam, KIC

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