Motives of the Heart

Today’s reading is taken from 2 Chron. 9 & Matt 5:17-26

Under Solomon’s reign Israel reaches its climax in the process of redemption that started in Egypt which is clearly seen especially in the building of the temple. Tall tales of Solomon’s wisdom, wealth and extravagance reached all corners of the world and ‘all the kings of the earth sought audience with Solomon to hear the wisdom God had put in his heart’ (v.23). The people, Solomon and the Queen of Sheba rightly see this as a blessing from God and recognize Him as the Source of this prosperity.

Chapter 9 is pretty much an inventory of what Solomon has accomplished. Two hundred shields of hammered gold, steps made of algumwood and the list goes on. Here, it is important to see God’s promises to Abraham being fulfilled by the establishing of the Davidic dynasty through Solomon. Under the blessing of God Solomon becomes a builder who undertakes several projects which included the Temple, his palace and the Palace of the Forest of Lebanon. However, as Solomon continues to bask in the glory and the success bestowed upon him by God he gradually forgets the big picture. Somewhere along the way Solomon stops building for the glory of God and Israel and starts to build for his own glory and vanity.

In Matthew 5 Jesus makes it abundantly clear that one’s outward expression should be the result of an inward godliness. Without God at the center of our motives, any outward action only goes to feed our own pride and self-exaltation. This is what happened to Solomon. Yes he built a Temple for God – probably his most acclaimed accomplishment, and continued to build to prosper Israel. However thanks to his over-sized harem his heart changes and is no longer set on God.

Solomon’s story is so much our story today. During those joyful seasons when we’re seeing success after success it is so easy to take all the credit and forget the Source of our prosperity. For us seasoned Christians the people around us may not even notice that subtle change in our hearts because, like the Pharisees, our outward faith or ‘religiosity’ may sometimes be what really defines us. But as Jesus puts in Matthew 5 it’s not what you do outwardly that is of the highest importance, but it’s the motive of your heart that counts, the very posture of your heart which needs be to set entirely on desiring Him and Him alone.

Sam, KIC

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